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Opening Day Rosters feature 234 Players born outside the U.S.

Opening Day Rosters feature 234 Players born outside the U.S.

Press Release Major League Baseball

27.7 Percent of Players Are Foreign-Born, Spanning 14 Countries and Territories

Two-hundred thirty-four (234) players on 2011 Opening Day rosters and disabled lists were born outside the 50 United States, it was announced today.

Overall, 27.7 percent of the 846 players (749 active 25-man roster players and 97 disabled or restricted Major League players) on March 31st rosters were born outside the 50 United States, representing 14 countries and territories. The alltime highs occurred in 2005, when 29.2 percent (242/829) of Opening Day players were foreignborn, and in 2007, when 246 players were born outside the U.S., totaling 29.0 percent of all players. Last season, 231 out of 833 players were foreign-born, also totaling 27.7 percent.

Once again, the Dominican Republic leads the Major Leagues with 86 players born outside the U.S. Venezuela ranks second with 62 players, its highest total ever on Opening Day rosters. Puerto Rico (20) has the next highest total, followed by Canada (16); Cuba (11); Japan (10); Mexico (8); Australia (5); Panama (4); Colombia (3); Curaçao (3); Taiwan (3); Nicaragua (2); and Korea (1). Since 1995, when MLB began to release annual Opening Day data, the 16 Canadian-born players rank second-highest (19 in 2007). Cuba matched its high of 11 set in 2002 and Australia matched its high of five set in 1998. In addition, Colombia, Taiwan and Nicaragua each matched their previous Opening Day bests.

The New York Yankees have the most foreign-born players with a total of 16, the first time the club has led the Majors since its 10 foreign-born players on Opening Day in 2000 shared the lead with three other clubs. Four Clubs – the Colorado Rockies, the Detroit Tigers, the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim and the Los Angeles Dodgers – feature 11 foreign-born players apiece, while the Chicago Cubs, the Cincinnati Reds, the Houston Astros, the New York Mets and the Texas Rangers each have 10. The Dodgers have players from eight different countries and territories outside the United States: Canada, Curaçao, the Dominican Republic, Japan, Nicaragua, Puerto Rico, Taiwan and Venezuela.

Please see the attached pdf-file for the complete list of foreign-born players on 2011 Opening Day rosters.

Foreign-Born Players – 234 Players on 2011 Opening Day Rost

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About Eric Bynum
Eric Bynum is Managing Editor here at BaseballdeWorld. He spent three years as an ESL teacher in South Korea, and is now working on his master's degree in history with a focus on baseball and WWII. He has played and/or written about baseball for the past 30 years and is an avid Atlanta Braves fan.

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  • http://nicholasrwhenning.blogspot.com Nicholas R.W. Henning

    Baseball has a much more international profile than it is given credit for. Its dumping from the Summer Olympic Games was disappointing, as a decent spread of countries won Olympic gold between 1992 and 2008. Cuba, the USA, and South Korea all won gold. If you compare this to Olympic Basketball, Team USA has only dropped gold once in 2004, and won gold in 1992, 1996, 2000, and 2008. Baseball is a game where good pitching can close a game down, which means that it’s game on a lot more so in Olympic Baseball.

  • http://www.baseballjourneyman.com Eric Bynum

    It is a shame they dumped baseball for the Olympics as it is really becoming a world wide sport. Hopefully with the success of the WBC, they will see to adding baseball back to the agenda at the Olympics.

  • Pingback: Baseball’s Slave Trade « Broken Bats

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